• Music/Medicine... 3.

    From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to James Bradley on Thu Sep 2 20:42:08 2010
    Hi yet again, James! This is the last installment in the current series:

    Humour is a tool that I hope/I'm sure everyone here
    has utilized to deal with the muck that surrounds us,
    but unless the muck is identical, the audience might
    not appreciate the speakers sense of humour about it.


    Yes, I think a sense of humour is a very valuable asset even if those
    around you find it incomprehensible. Your feeling of being at a loss for words
    when somebody wishes you a "speedy recovery" also reminds me of another. Years
    ago I read an account by the father of a young child with Down's syndrome. One
    day a neighbour dropped by & exclaimed "You let him walk on the chesterfield??"
    (We know people like that. I reckon many others in this echo probably do too.)
    The father could have patiently informed her that the PT had advised the family
    to encourage the child to walk on various surfaces to improve his balance etc.,
    and that he attached a higher priority to his son's needs than to the condition
    of the chesterfield... but this woman doesn't sound like the type of person who
    would be able to grasp the concept. He could have told her to MYOB, but he may
    have wanted to maintain an approximation of peaceful coexistence with her. His
    response was "Thank God he can walk!" IMHO he put it in a nutshell there. ;-)



    [re Gacy]
    The serial killer? JFTR, I had to google his
    name.... :-)

    You didn't *have* to, JFTR. <L>


    Oops. Good point! I chose to use my preferred learning style. Even
    if somebody holds a gun to one's head, one has choices... [grin].



    And you wonder how he got that way... I can relate.

    "Ow... I didn't know *that* crack was in the pavement.
    How might we fill it, so it never opens up again?"


    I once read about a guy in the States who asked for the death penalty
    because his "illness" had no "cure". He was a violent rapist who seemed unable
    to control his behaviour despite his remorse. As a parent I'm tempted to throw
    the book at such people... I want them to be where they can't do the same thing
    ever again... OTOH as an individual who often falls between the cracks I wonder
    if we as a society have failed to meet their needs. Some people who are abused
    the way Gacy was resolve that the cycle of abuse will end with them & manage to
    turn their lives around... others don't. We still have a lot to learn.... :-(




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From Dallas Hinton@1:153/716 to mark lewis on Sat Sep 4 01:58:56 2010
    Hi mark -- on Sep 03 2010 at 19:58, you wrote:

    yes, he surely did that! my question is "what is a/the
    chesterfield??"

    Also known as a couch, a divan, a sofa .... a long (2-4 seats) upholstered thing like a chair but much wider. :-)


    Cheers... Dallas

    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: The BandMaster, CANADA [telnet: bandmaster.tzo.com] (1:153/716)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to James Bradley on Thu Oct 21 23:46:26 2010
    Hi, James! Recently you wrote in a message to Ardith Hinton:

    Hi yet again, James!

    Yup... Still here, just too busy. <chuckle>


    Understood. I'm still here too. We were busy for awhile, and then I
    developed a rotator cuff (shoulder muscle) injury which makes typing difficult.
    I gather it's somewhat akin to your bursitis. I'm now on the mend, anyway, and
    hoping to complete various replies to you & others within the near future. :-)




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to James Bradley on Sun Nov 21 22:36:14 2010
    Hi, James! Recently you wrote in a message to Ardith Hinton:

    I'm still here too. We were busy for awhile, and then
    I developed a rotator cuff (shoulder muscle) injury
    which makes typing difficult. I gather it's somewhat
    akin to your bursitis. I'm now on the mend, anyway,
    and hoping to complete various replies to you &
    others within the near future. :-)

    No... I doubt it. My bursitis is self inflicted. <L>


    In retrospect, I had been pushing my physical limits for some time...
    but until the pain settled in I didn't consciously add everything up. Seems to
    me you know when you're overdoing it. I'll know better in future (maybe). :-)



    Seriously, this isn't the first time it has given you
    trouble, right?


    You're thinking of the other shoulder... [wry grin].



    Just to give you more exercise, I'll keep asking questions
    for you to answer. <EG> It's muscle tears or inflammation
    of connective tissue?


    According to our chiropractor, it's inflammation. He has a technique
    for draining the lymph glands which seems to have helped a lot. He is also the
    person who initially compared it to bursitis... which, BTW, both my father & my
    father-in-law had many years ago. I gather any repetitive motion involving the
    shoulder (such as hammering nails or digging up the vegetable garden in spring)
    can lead to this sort of problem, especially with people who are middle-aged or
    older & whose endurance isn't quite what it used to be. I imagine you may have
    been building yet another fence when your shoulder said "Enough, already!" ;-)



    Did you forget your PT suggestions, or did life
    find you in a position to lift while twisting.


    Yes. I had been negligent WRT the exercises I generally do during TV
    commercial breaks. (To me they're boring, as are the majority of commercials.)
    Although these exercises involve both shoulders, we seldom watch much TV in the
    warmer & drier months. Then summer's end found me in circumstances akin to the
    latter. It's a long story, but I am beginning to see the humour in it.... :-)



    (I know I'm showing my ignorance but by the name,
    I suppose it is the muscle group that allows you
    to swing your arm up and down?)


    Yes, or lift it high enough to brush your own teeth without some kind
    of support for the shoulder. I kept my elbows close to my body & supported the
    injured side with the opposite hand at first. And contrary to proper etiquette ... i.e. as generally prescribed for "strong & able" young folks at summer camp ... I made use of any available surface for support when I had to raise my hand
    to my mouth at mealtimes. I'm practising to be a feisty old lady some day. If
    others would rather I starve than put my elbows on the table, I've got news for
    them! For those who aren't so hung up on convention I'd be more than delighted
    to explain how I've modified my computer desk & chair at no extra cost.... :-)



    At any rate, *do* take care, and don't worry about nuts
    like me while you take care of more pressing matters. I
    *think* I can forgive you for your reticence. [-|{


    Aww, shucks! Thanks.... :-)

    I start to worry about you when I haven't heard a peep out of Calgary
    in two months because Kevin's system is down. Apart from that... I realize I'm
    a weirdo. All my favourite people are weirdos. How could it be otherwise when
    we're dealing with weird stuff hardly anybody else understands? If it takes me
    awhile to answer sometimes, it may also be I'm blown away that you do.... :-))




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From Daryl Stout@1:19/33 to ARDITH HINTON on Sat Mar 3 02:20:00 2018
    Ardith,

    You're thinking of the other shoulder... [wry grin].

    My shoulders give me fits...with all the arthritis (it is throughout
    my body). If it affects my sleep, I take a 400 mg Ibuprofen, and that
    helps things. But, I can't take it right after taking NyQuil. I'm hypersensitive to anesthetics, narcotics, etc.

    Daryl
    ===
    OLX 1.53 2 wrongs don't make a right - but 3 lefts do!
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    * Origin: FIDONet: The Thunderbolt BBS - wx1der.dyndns.org (1:19/33)