• Unifi

    From Rick Smith@1:105/81 to All on Mon Sep 13 05:55:20 2021
    Hello All!

    Are any of you ipv6'rs using unifi products such as the UDMP?

    Regards,

    Rick

    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5-b20180707
    * Origin: Awesome Net- Oregon FTN Hub - Portland, OR - www.awesomen (1:105/81)
  • From Michiel van der Vlist@2:280/5555 to Rick Smith on Mon Sep 13 21:43:42 2021
    Hello Rick,

    On Monday September 13 2021 05:55, you wrote to All:

    Are any of you ipv6'rs using unifi products such as the UDMP?

    Sorry, can't help you there.

    So have you contacted your ISP? Did they enable IPv6 for you?


    Cheers, Michiel

    --- GoldED+/W32-MSVC 1.1.5-b20170303
    * Origin: he.net certified sage (2:280/5555)
  • From Rick Smith@1:105/81 to Michiel van der Vlist on Mon Sep 13 14:44:10 2021
    Hello Michiel!

    Monday September 13 2021 21:43, you wrote to me:

    * Forwarded from area 'IPV6'
    Hello Rick,

    On Monday September 13 2021 05:55, you wrote to All:

    Are any of you ipv6'rs using unifi products such as the UDMP?

    Sorry, can't help you there.

    So have you contacted your ISP? Did they enable IPv6 for you?

    Still working on it

    Regards,

    Rick

    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5-b20180707
    * Origin: Awesome Net- Oregon FTN Hub - Portland, OR - www.awesomen (1:105/81)
  • From Rick Smith@1:105/81 to Michiel van der Vlist on Mon Sep 13 15:26:08 2021
    Hello Michiel!

    Monday September 13 2021 21:43, you wrote to me:

    * Forwarded from area 'IPV6'
    Hello Rick,

    On Monday September 13 2021 05:55, you wrote to All:

    Are any of you ipv6'rs using unifi products such as the UDMP?

    Not looking good, apparently they say I cant have ipV6 addresses unless I use their modem?? That seems weird to me but what do I know....

    Regards,

    Rick

    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5-b20180707
    * Origin: Awesome Net- Oregon FTN Hub - Portland, OR - www.awesomen (1:105/81)
  • From Brian Rogers@1:142/103 to Rick Smith on Mon Sep 13 22:30:00 2021
    Rick;

    [snip]

    I use their modem?? That seems weird to me but what do I know....

    You can always get a tunneled IPv6 block free from HE.net and tell your ISP
    to piss off. That's what I basically did and I've been fine since.

    ... Old white water rafters never die, they just get disgorged.
    --- MultiMail/Linux v0.52
    * Origin: SBBS - Carnage! 2001:470:8a1e::3 (1:142/103)
  • From Rick Smith@1:105/81 to Brian Rogers on Mon Sep 13 19:57:36 2021
    Hello Brian!

    Monday September 13 2021 22:30, you wrote to me:

    * Forwarded from area 'IPV6'
    Rick;

    [snip]

    I use their modem?? That seems weird to me but what do I
    know....

    You can always get a tunneled IPv6 block free from HE.net and tell
    your ISP to piss off. That's what I basically did and I've been fine since.

    Thank you for the suggestion, unfortunately I have not an idea of what that means, I even went to their website to see if it would be obvious and it was not.. I think ill just stick to the ipv4 I have the block and it works...

    Regards,

    Rick

    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5-b20180707
    * Origin: Awesome Net- Oregon FTN Hub - Portland, OR - www.awesomen (1:105/81)
  • From Stas Mishchenkov@2:460/5858 to Rick Smith on Tue Sep 14 11:28:12 2021
    Hi Rick!

    Monday September 13 2021 19:57, you wrote to Brian Rogers:

    Thank you for the suggestion, unfortunately I have not an idea of what that means, I even went to their website to see if it would be obvious
    and it was not..

    https://tunnelbroker.net/

    Have a nice night.
    Stas Mishchenkov.

    --- Have You daily sexual life? Hide it proper from Your wife! ;)
    * Origin: Lame Users Breeding. Simferopol, Crimea. (2:460/5858)
  • From Tommi Koivula@2:221/360 to Brian Rogers on Tue Sep 14 13:16:38 2021
    Hi Brian.

    13 Sep 21 22:30, you wrote to Rick Smith:

    You can always get a tunneled IPv6 block free from HE.net and tell
    your ISP to piss off. That's what I basically did and I've been fine since.

    And he.net tunnel is nice because you always get static addresses. :)

    'Tommi

    ---
    * Origin: 2001:470:79c5::24/48 (2:221/360)
  • From Rick Smith@1:105/81 to Stas Mishchenkov on Tue Sep 14 06:10:46 2021
    Hello Stas!

    Tuesday September 14 2021 11:28, you wrote to me:

    * Forwarded from area 'IPV6'
    Hi Rick!

    Monday September 13 2021 19:57, you wrote to Brian Rogers:

    Thank you for the suggestion, unfortunately I have not an idea of
    what that means, I even went to their website to see if it would
    be obvious and it was not..

    https://tunnelbroker.net/

    Thank you I am looking into this

    Regards,

    Rick
    --- GoldED+/LNX 1.1.5-b20180707
    * Origin: Awesome Net- Oregon FTN Hub - Portland, OR - www.awesomen (1:105/81)
  • From Victor Sudakov@2:5005/49 to Rick Smith on Tue Sep 14 21:28:18 2021
    Dear Rick,

    13 Sep 21 15:26, you wrote to Michiel van der Vlist:

    Are any of you ipv6'rs using unifi products such as the UDMP?

    Not looking good, apparently they say I cant have ipV6 addresses
    unless I use their modem??

    I've heard the same from a Rostelecom representative. They told me I cannot get an IPv6 address on the interface of my own router, let alone a subnet.

    Victor Sudakov, VAS4-RIPE, VAS47-RIPN
    --- GoldED+/BSD 1.1.5-b20170303-b20170303
    * Origin: Ulthar (2:5005/49)
  • From Victor Sudakov@2:5005/49 to Brian Rogers on Tue Sep 14 21:40:00 2021
    Dear Brian,

    13 Sep 21 22:30, you wrote to Rick Smith:

    I use their modem?? That seems weird to me but what do I
    know....

    You can always get a tunneled IPv6 block free from HE.net and tell
    your ISP to piss off. That's what I basically did and I've been fine since.

    That's what I've done, but it results in a lower bandwidth over IPv6, and extra hops. The bandwidth is so much lower that browsers tend to fall back to IPv4 (Yes I know there is a tweak to stop this behaviour in Firefox, nevertheless my IPv6 connection is inferior to IPv4).

    Victor Sudakov, VAS4-RIPE, VAS47-RIPN
    --- GoldED+/BSD 1.1.5-b20170303-b20170303
    * Origin: Ulthar (2:5005/49)
  • From Brian Rogers@1:142/103 to Rick Smith on Tue Sep 14 10:35:00 2021
    Rick;

    Rick Smith wrote to Brian Rogers <=-

    Thank you for the suggestion, unfortunately I have not an idea of what that means, I even went to their website to see if it would be obvious
    and it was not.. I think ill just stick to the ipv4 I have the block
    and it works...

    IPv4 is going to be a thing of the past and the sooner you learn IPv6 the better off you're going to be. From he.net, go to tunnel broker. Sign up! You'll bind your IPv4 to their IPv6. Samples of how to do it are pre-provided by their website.

    Hurricane Electric is also global so their routing on IPv6 is amazing. Some of their tech staff are also ham radio operators so they're quite tech savvy.

    ... Old wrestlers never die, they just lose their grip.
    --- MultiMail/Linux v0.52
    * Origin: SBBS - Carnage! 2001:470:8a1e::3 (1:142/103)
  • From Brian Rogers@1:142/103 to Tommi Koivula on Tue Sep 14 10:39:00 2021
    Hey Tommi;

    Tommi Koivula wrote to Brian Rogers <=-

    And he.net tunnel is nice because you always get static addresses. :)

    That is always a nice thing! But it also has some disadvantages too especially if you get someone super mad at you <G>

    ... Old pilots never die, they just go to a higher plane.
    --- MultiMail/Linux v0.52
    * Origin: SBBS - Carnage! 2001:470:8a1e::3 (1:142/103)
  • From Brian Rogers@1:142/103 to Victor Sudakov on Tue Sep 14 10:53:00 2021
    Hello Victor;

    Victor Sudakov wrote to Brian Rogers <=-

    That's what I've done, but it results in a lower bandwidth over IPv6,
    and extra hops. The bandwidth is so much lower that browsers tend to
    fall back to IPv4 (Yes I know there is a tweak to stop this behaviour
    in Firefox, nevertheless my IPv6 connection is inferior to IPv4).

    I haven't had that issue. There are some websites such as Yahoo that will
    block Firefox on IPv6 I wonder if that's what you're experiencing?

    ... Pelvis - Second cousin to Elvis
    --- MultiMail/Linux v0.52
    * Origin: SBBS - Carnage! 2001:470:8a1e::3 (1:142/103)
  • From Michiel van der Vlist@2:280/5555 to Rick Smith on Tue Sep 14 22:04:51 2021
    Hello Rick,

    On Monday September 13 2021 15:26, you wrote to me:

    Not looking good, apparently they say I cant have ipV6 addresses
    unless I use their modem?? That seems weird to me but what do I
    know....

    That sounds familiar...

    Here (Netherlands) network providers supply a "free" modem/router to their csutomers. Most DSL providers allow customers to use their own but leading cable provider Ziggo will not allow you to use you own /modem/. One can have their modem/router set in bridge mode and have one's own router behind it ithough. However... in that case one has an IPv4 only connection. So more or less the same situation as in your case. For now I use their modem/router.

    A new law that comes into effect in januari forces providers to have customers use their own equipment after the Network Termination Point. So than I can use my own modem/router and still have native IPv6. But Ziggo is dragging their feet and we may see some legal squirmishes before that happens. We will see...


    Cheers, Michiel

    --- GoldED+/W32-MSVC 1.1.5-b20170303
    * Origin: he.net certified sage (2:280/5555)
  • From Michiel van der Vlist@2:280/5555 to Rick Smith on Tue Sep 14 22:41:59 2021
    Hello Rick,

    Tuesday September 14 2021 10:35, Brian Rogers wrote to you:

    IPv4 is going to be a thing of the past and the sooner you learn IPv6
    the better off you're going to be. From he.net, go to tunnel broker.
    Sign up! You'll bind your IPv4 to their IPv6. Samples of how to do it
    are pre-provided by their website.

    I can only concur. Open an account with he.net. It is free and even if in the end you decide not to make use of their free tunnel service, there is a lot to learn there. They offer turorials, and you can get "certificates". They used to hand out T-shirts for those who graduate to "sage" status but apparently they no longer do.

    http://www.vlist.eu/fotos/sage-f.jpg
    http://www.vlist.eu/fotos/sage-b.jpg

    And of course if you need help with setting up a tunnel, you can always ask here. Many of us have set up tunnels in the past, myself included.


    Cheers, Michiel

    --- GoldED+/W32-MSVC 1.1.5-b20170303
    * Origin: he.net certified sage (2:280/5555)
  • From Brian Rogers@1:142/103 to Michiel van der Vlist on Wed Sep 15 00:51:00 2021
    Hello Michiel;

    Michiel van der Vlist wrote to Rick Smith <=-

    I can only concur. Open an account with he.net. It is free and even if
    in the end you decide not to make use of their free tunnel service,
    there is a lot to learn there. They offer turorials, and you can get "certificates". They used to hand out T-shirts for those who graduate
    to "sage" status but apparently they no longer do.

    I have 2 /48 blocks with them, one I have for a client the other I use for myself AND I broker IPs for amateur packet radio usage. Ax.25 requires ARP
    for transporting IP and IPv6 doesn't use ARP but I've figured out a way
    to do it.

    I've passed my "sage" twice but only received 1 t-shirt. That was a cool
    thing they did.

    ... Football is a game designed to keep coalminers off the streets
    --- MultiMail/Linux v0.52
    * Origin: SBBS - Carnage! 2001:470:8a1e::3 (1:142/103)
  • From Michiel van der Vlist@2:280/5555 to Victor Sudakov on Wed Sep 15 14:02:52 2021
    Hello Victor,

    On Tuesday September 14 2021 21:40, you wrote to Brian Rogers:

    You can always get a tunneled IPv6 block free from HE.net and
    tell your ISP to piss off. That's what I basically did and I've
    been fine since.

    That's what I've done, but it results in a lower bandwidth over IPv6,
    and extra hops.

    A tunnel is good, native IPv6 is better. I noticed it too when I used tunnels. IPv6 over the tunnel is significantky slower than IPv4. Up to 50% slower. Native IPv6 is always preferable so we we should all keep perstering our ISPs about IPv6.

    The bandwidth is so much lower that browsers tend to fall back to IPv4

    I haven't seen that particular problem.

    (Yes I know there is a tweak to stop this behaviour in Firefox, nevertheless my IPv6 connection is inferior to IPv4).

    As I said: native is preferable, but a tunnel is better than no IPv6 at all.


    Cheers, Michiel


    --- GoldED+/W32-MSVC 1.1.5-b20170303
    * Origin: he.net certified sage (2:280/5555)
  • From Kurt Weiske@1:218/700 to Brian Rogers on Wed Sep 15 08:21:00 2021
    Brian Rogers wrote to Rick Smith <=-

    Hurricane Electric is also global so their routing on IPv6 is amazing. Some of their tech staff are also ham radio operators so they're quite tech savvy.

    A local alarm company, Bay Alarm, got into the hosting business after self- hosting their infrastructure and wanting to make money off of the unused square footage in their space. They figured with their background in
    security they'd have a good start into colocation. That was how HE got their start.


    ... Discard an axiom
    --- MultiMail/DOS v0.52
    * Origin: http://realitycheckbbs.org | tomorrow's retro tech (1:218/700)
  • From Brian Rogers@1:142/103 to Michiel van der Vlist on Wed Sep 15 11:30:00 2021
    Michiel;

    Michiel van der Vlist wrote to Victor Sudakov <=-

    A tunnel is good, native IPv6 is better. I noticed it too when I used tunnels. IPv6 over the tunnel is significantky slower than IPv4. Up to 50% slower. Native IPv6 is always preferable so we we should all keep perstering our ISPs about IPv6.

    If you were getting that much of a slowdown, something else was going on. Granted the MTU is slightly and I mean slightly less than native IPv6 or
    IPv4, but it's only by 20 bytes/1500 byte packet. Doing the math, this does
    NOT equal a 50% lag. Maybe the issue is that your ISP's path to your IPv6 tunnel provider is not an optimum path? Mine is just a couple hops away
    so it's not an issue for me.

    As I said: native is preferable, but a tunnel is better than no IPv6 at all.

    This is true.

    ... So eager to play, so reluctant to admit it
    --- MultiMail/Linux v0.52
    * Origin: SBBS - Carnage! 2001:470:8a1e::3 (1:142/103)
  • From Brian Rogers@1:142/103 to Kurt Weiske on Wed Sep 15 12:02:00 2021
    Hello Kurt;

    Kurt Weiske wrote to Brian Rogers <=-

    A local alarm company, Bay Alarm, got into the hosting business after self- hosting their infrastructure and wanting to make money off of the unused square footage in their space. They figured with their
    background in security they'd have a good start into colocation. That
    was how HE got their start.

    Nice story. I've had wonderful tech support when I've needed it from HE.net. They seem quite knowledgable and the cert tests they had were priceless.

    ... DOOM: See you in hell.
    --- MultiMail/Linux v0.52
    * Origin: SBBS - Carnage! 2001:470:8a1e::3 (1:142/103)
  • From Michiel van der Vlist@2:280/5555 to Brian Rogers on Wed Sep 15 19:15:20 2021
    Hello Brian,

    On Wednesday September 15 2021 11:30, you wrote to me:

    A tunnel is good, native IPv6 is better. I noticed it too when I
    used tunnels. IPv6 over the tunnel is significantky slower than
    IPv4. Up to 50% slower. Native IPv6 is always preferable so we
    we should all keep perstering our ISPs about IPv6.

    If you were getting that much of a slowdown, something else was going
    on.

    Sure. The frustrating part is that I was never able to figure out what it was.

    Granted the MTU is slightly and I mean slightly less than native
    IPv6 or IPv4, but it's only by 20 bytes/1500 byte packet. Doing the
    math, this does NOT equal a 50% lag.

    Indeed, so it is not that.

    Maybe the issue is that your ISP's path to your IPv6 tunnel provider
    is not an optimum path? Mine is just a couple hops away so it's not an issue for me.

    Unlikely. I used the the he.net POP in Amsterdam, no-one in The Netherlands is more than a couple of hops from AMS-IX.

    The prime suspect is still the router that ran my tunnel endpoint back than. A Linksys WRT54G running OpenWrt. But I could bever make sure.

    Now it is irrelevent, I now have native IPv6 and I see no significant difference in pefomance between IPv6 and IPv4.

    Cheers, Michiel

    --- GoldED+/W32-MSVC 1.1.5-b20170303
    * Origin: he.net certified sage (2:280/5555)
  • From Brian Rogers@1:142/103 to Michiel van der Vlist on Wed Sep 15 14:06:00 2021
    Hello Michiel;

    Michiel van der Vlist wrote to Brian Rogers <=-

    The prime suspect is still the router that ran my tunnel endpoint back than. A Linksys WRT54G running OpenWrt. But I could bever make sure.

    I'd put money on that being the cause. We haven't used that router here
    in almost 10 years! It's quite antiquated and not a very fast packet switch.

    ... MICROBIOLOGISTS do it with culture.
    --- MultiMail/Linux v0.52
    * Origin: SBBS - Carnage! 2001:470:8a1e::3 (1:142/103)
  • From Michiel van der Vlist@2:280/5555 to Brian Rogers on Thu Sep 16 09:55:40 2021
    Hello Brian,

    On Wednesday September 15 2021 14:06, you wrote to me:

    The prime suspect is still the router that ran my tunnel endpoint
    back than. A Linksys WRT54G running OpenWrt. But I could bever make
    sure.

    I'd put money on that being the cause. We haven't used that router
    here in almost 10 years! It's quite antiquated and not a very fast
    packet switch.

    Yes, it is antiquated. But it /was/ ten years ago that I installed it as the tunnel endpoint and back then I only had a 30/3 Mbps connection.

    I wrote a series of Fidonews articles about it under the title "A second life for the Linksys".


    Cheers, Michiel

    --- GoldED+/W32-MSVC 1.1.5-b20170303
    * Origin: he.net certified sage (2:280/5555)
  • From Victor Sudakov@2:5005/49 to Brian Rogers on Thu Sep 16 19:51:32 2021
    Dear Brian,

    14 Sep 21 10:53, you wrote to me:

    That's what I've done, but it results in a lower bandwidth over
    IPv6, and extra hops. The bandwidth is so much lower that
    browsers tend to fall back to IPv4 (Yes I know there is a tweak
    to stop this behaviour in Firefox, nevertheless my IPv6
    connection is inferior to IPv4).

    I haven't had that issue. There are some websites such as Yahoo that
    will block Firefox on IPv6 I wonder if that's what you're
    experiencing?

    I don't think so. Try https://ipv6-test.com/ and http://test-ipv6.com/ they will tell you what protocol your browser prefers and if it tends to fall back to IPv4. There you can also compare your speed over IPv4 vs IPv6.

    The tweak for Firefox is or was user_pref("network.http.fast-fallback-to-IPv4", false);


    Victor Sudakov, VAS4-RIPE, VAS47-RIPN
    --- GoldED+/BSD 1.1.5-b20170303-b20170303
    * Origin: Ulthar (2:5005/49)
  • From Victor Sudakov@2:5005/49 to Michiel van der Vlist on Thu Sep 16 19:59:38 2021
    Dear Michiel,

    15 Sep 21 14:02, you wrote to me:

    You can always get a tunneled IPv6 block free from HE.net and
    tell your ISP to piss off. That's what I basically did and I've
    been fine since.

    That's what I've done, but it results in a lower bandwidth over
    IPv6, and extra hops.

    A tunnel is good, native IPv6 is better. I noticed it too when I used tunnels. IPv6 over the tunnel is significantky slower than IPv4. Up to
    50% slower. Native IPv6 is always preferable so we we should all keep perstering our ISPs about IPv6.

    I fully agree.

    The bandwidth is so much lower that browsers tend to fall back to
    IPv4

    I haven't seen that particular problem.

    Please see my reply to Brian.

    (Yes I know there is a tweak to stop this behaviour in Firefox,
    nevertheless my IPv6 connection is inferior to IPv4).

    As I said: native is preferable, but a tunnel is better than no IPv6
    at all.

    Sure.

    Victor Sudakov, VAS4-RIPE, VAS47-RIPN
    --- GoldED+/BSD 1.1.5-b20170303-b20170303
    * Origin: Ulthar (2:5005/49)
  • From Brian Rogers@1:142/103 to Michiel van der Vlist on Thu Sep 16 18:01:00 2021
    Hello Michiel;

    Michiel van der Vlist wrote to Brian Rogers <=-

    I wrote a series of Fidonews articles about it under the title "A
    second life for the Linksys".

    You might as well been better off using a Raspberry Pi. That's what I use
    for my IPv6 "router". Works fine for me.

    ... VALUABLE STORE COUPON HAS BEEN REMOVED!
    --- MultiMail/Linux v0.52
    * Origin: SBBS - Carnage! 2001:470:8a1e::3 (1:142/103)
  • From Brian Rogers@1:142/103 to Victor Sudakov on Thu Sep 16 18:45:00 2021
    Hello Victor;

    Victor Sudakov wrote to Brian Rogers <=-

    I don't think so.
    [snip]

    I know for a fact that Yahoo blocks Firefox on IPv6, they may even redirect
    you to a non-SSL page that reflects such. Yahoo claims that SSL on IPv6 for Firefox has security issues thus they deny access to their site because of it. Now whether or not that's factually true is another story when you consider they've been cracked twice. Yahoo is the only site I've had an issue with being blocked.

    ... What do you call a pig with laryngitis? Disgruntled.
    --- MultiMail/Linux v0.52
    * Origin: SBBS - Carnage! 2001:470:8a1e::3 (1:142/103)
  • From Michiel van der Vlist@2:280/5555 to Brian Rogers on Fri Sep 17 08:57:03 2021
    Hello Brian,

    On Thursday September 16 2021 18:01, you wrote to me:

    I wrote a series of Fidonews articles about it under the title
    "A second life for the Linksys".

    You might as well been better off using a Raspberry Pi.

    Perhaps. But an unused Linksys is what I had laying around.

    That's what I use for my IPv6 "router". Works fine for me.

    The Raspberrys that I have seen have only only ethernet port. Do the later models have at least two ethernet ports so that one can make a WAN port and a LAN port?


    Cheers, Michiel

    --- GoldED+/W32-MSVC 1.1.5-b20170303
    * Origin: he.net certified sage (2:280/5555)
  • From Alexey Vissarionov@2:5020/545 to Michiel van der Vlist on Fri Sep 17 12:34:56 2021
    Good ${greeting_time}, Michiel!

    17 Sep 2021 08:57:02, you wrote to Brian Rogers:

    You might as well been better off using a Raspberry Pi.
    That's what I use for my IPv6 "router". Works fine for me.
    MvdV> The Raspberrys that I have seen have only only ethernet port.

    That's well enough.

    MvdV> Do the later models have at least two ethernet ports so that
    MvdV> one can make a WAN port and a LAN port?

    There are NanoPi R2S devices, but they are quite expensive (almost 100 EUR). Buying a smarter switch with 802.1Q VLAN support would be much cheaper and significantly more flexible option.


    --
    Alexey V. Vissarionov aka Gremlin from Kremlin
    gremlin.ru!gremlin; +vii-cmiii-ccxxix-lxxix-xlii

    ... that's why I really dislike fools.
    --- /bin/vi
    * Origin: ::1 (2:5020/545)
  • From Tommi Koivula@2:221/1 to Michiel van der Vlist on Fri Sep 17 14:48:54 2021

    17 Sep 21 08:57, Michiel van der Vlist wrote to Brian Rogers:

    That's what I use for my IPv6 "router". Works fine for me.

    The Raspberrys that I have seen have only only ethernet port. Do the later models have at least two ethernet ports
    so that one can make a WAN port and a LAN port?

    Ever heard of VLAN's :)

    'Tommi

    ---
    * Origin: 2a01:4f9:c011:1ec5:f1d0:2:221:1 (2:221/1)
  • From Brian Rogers@1:142/103 to Michiel van der Vlist on Fri Sep 17 10:41:00 2021
    Hello Michiel;

    Michiel van der Vlist wrote to Brian Rogers <=-

    Perhaps. But an unused Linksys is what I had laying around.

    Understood.

    The Raspberrys that I have seen have only only ethernet port. Do the later models have at least two ethernet ports so that one can make a
    WAN port and a LAN port?

    I haven't seen any however you can turn one into a wifi access point
    quit easily.

    ... Cases of fetishists with IQ's over 150 have beem documented."--Scully
    --- MultiMail/Linux v0.52
    * Origin: SBBS - Carnage! 2001:470:8a1e::3 (1:142/103)
  • From Mike Miller@1:154/30.1 to Tommi Koivula on Fri Sep 17 10:28:46 2021
    Hello, Tommi Koivula.
    On 9/17/21 2:48 PM you wrote:

    17 Sep 21 08:57, Michiel van der Vlist wrote to Brian Rogers:
    That's what I use for my IPv6 "router". Works fine for me.
    The Raspberrys that I have seen have only only ethernet port. Do
    the later models have at least two ethernet ports so that one can
    make a WAN port and a LAN port?
    Ever heard of VLAN's :)

    Heh. I was going to suggest VLANs. I use them on my home network pretty heavily, (and I'm going to lean on them even harder when I inevitably upgrade to 10gbe or 25gbe, depending upon when prices drop.). I do have my WAN and LAN ports physically separated on my pfsense router, but that's only because I had the spare gbe ports.

    OPNsense has an ARM build in development that seems to work on the raspberry pi.

    RPIs also have USB 3.0 ports, so using a eth/USB dongle could be an option, too.




    --
    Mike
    BBS: warensemble.com
    --- Hotdoged/2.13.5/Android
    * Origin: South of Heaven - warensemble.com (1:154/30.1)
  • From Alexey Vissarionov@2:5020/545 to Brian Rogers on Fri Sep 17 19:20:20 2021
    Good ${greeting_time}, Brian!

    17 Sep 2021 10:41:00, you wrote to Michiel van der Vlist:

    The Raspberrys that I have seen have only only ethernet port. Do
    the later models have at least two ethernet ports so that one can
    make a WAN port and a LAN port?
    I haven't seen any however you can turn one into a wifi access point
    quit easily.

    Yes - that's normally as easy as:

    # cat /etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf
    interface=wlan0
    driver=nl80211
    logger_syslog=-1
    logger_syslog_level=2
    logger_stdout=-1
    logger_stdout_level=1
    ctrl_interface_group=wheel
    ssid=YetAnotherAP
    country_code=JP
    hw_mode=g
    channel=10
    beacon_int=100
    dtim_period=2
    max_num_sta=255
    rts_threshold=-1
    fragm_threshold=-1
    macaddr_acl=0
    auth_algs=1
    ignore_broadcast_ssid=0
    wmm_enabled=0
    eapol_key_index_workaround=0
    eap_server=0
    wpa=2
    wpa_passphrase=****************
    wpa_pairwise=CCMP
    wps_state=0

    Also, the `head -c12 /dev/urandom | openssl base64` command would give you a really good passphrase.


    --
    Alexey V. Vissarionov aka Gremlin from Kremlin
    gremlin.ru!gremlin; +vii-cmiii-ccxxix-lxxix-xlii

    ... GPG: 8832FE9FA791F7968AC96E4E909DAC45EF3B1FA8 @ hkp://keys.gnupg.net
    --- /bin/vi
    * Origin: ::1 (2:5020/545)
  • From Michiel van der Vlist@2:280/5555 to Brian Rogers on Fri Sep 17 18:18:39 2021
    Hello Brian,

    On Friday September 17 2021 10:41, you wrote to me:

    Perhaps. But an unused Linksys is what I had laying around.

    Understood.

    Playing around with that linksys to configure the tunnel endpoint and distributing IPv6 to the devices in the LAN was an interesting experience.

    The Raspberrys that I have seen have only only ethernet port. Do
    the later models have at least two ethernet ports so that one
    can make a WAN port and a LAN port?

    I haven't seen any however you can turn one into a wifi access point
    quit easily.

    I prefer to have my devices connected by wire whenever practical and possible. So WiFi only isn't good enough for me.


    Cheers, Michiel

    --- GoldED+/W32-MSVC 1.1.5-b20170303
    * Origin: he.net certified sage (2:280/5555)
  • From Brian Rogers@1:142/103 to Alexey Vissarionov on Sat Sep 18 07:43:00 2021
    Hello Alexey;

    Alexey Vissarionov wrote to Brian Rogers <=-

    Yes - that's normally as easy as:

    [snip]

    Absolutely... of course the driver would have to match the wifi dongle.

    Also, the `head -c12 /dev/urandom | openssl base64` command would give
    you a really good passphrase.

    Yes it will :)

    As someone else pointed out, a wired VLAN situation could help... OR instead
    of a Pi, a PC with dual nics works slick too and an older machine would
    be fine for such a thing.

    ... A truck full of tortoises crashed with one full of terrapins. It was a turtl
    --- MultiMail/Linux v0.52
    * Origin: SBBS - Carnage! 2001:470:8a1e::3 (1:142/103)
  • From Brian Rogers@1:142/103 to Michiel van der Vlist on Sat Sep 18 07:47:00 2021
    Hello Michiel;

    Michiel van der Vlist wrote to Brian Rogers <=-

    Playing around with that linksys to configure the tunnel endpoint and distributing IPv6 to the devices in the LAN was an interesting experience.

    I'm sure it was! Learning IPv6 isn't really that difficult if you follow the logistics used in IPv4. Routing, iptables, etc are all pretty parallel to
    each other.

    I prefer to have my devices connected by wire whenever practical and possible. So WiFi only isn't good enough for me.

    You could use an old paperweight PC with a bare minimum install and just
    add the tools you need, along with 2 NICs. Actually BSD makes for a better router than linux does.

    ... How much did the pirate pay to get his ears pierced? A buccaneer.
    --- MultiMail/Linux v0.52
    * Origin: SBBS - Carnage! 2001:470:8a1e::3 (1:142/103)
  • From Michiel van der Vlist@2:280/5555 to Brian Rogers on Sat Sep 18 22:34:01 2021
    Hello Brian,

    On Saturday September 18 2021 07:47, you wrote to me:

    Playing around with that linksys to configure the tunnel
    endpoint and distributing IPv6 to the devices in the LAN was an
    interesting experience.

    I'm sure it was! Learning IPv6 isn't really that difficult if you
    follow the logistics used in IPv4. Routing, iptables, etc are all
    pretty parallel to each other.

    There I only partly agree. Sure, many things are the same or similar in IPv4 and IPv6. But I also find that many newcomers to IPv6 have difficulty to get rid of "IPv4 think". To let go of the idea that NAT is "security" and that IPv6 is insecure because it does not use NAT is something that needs to sink in. Also it takes a while to realize that there is no need to be greedy when assigning addresses. There are 2^64 addresses in a subnet...

    I prefer to have my devices connected by wire whenever practical
    and possible. So WiFi only isn't good enough for me.

    You could use an old paperweight PC with a bare minimum install and
    just add the tools you need, along with 2 NICs. Actually BSD makes for
    a better router than linux does.

    There is more than one road that leads to Rome...


    Cheers, Michiel

    --- GoldED+/W32-MSVC 1.1.5-b20170303
    * Origin: he.net certified sage (2:280/5555)
  • From Brian Rogers@1:142/103 to Michiel van der Vlist on Sun Sep 19 08:35:00 2021
    Hello Michiel;

    Michiel van der Vlist wrote to Brian Rogers <=-

    There I only partly agree. Sure, many things are the same or similar in IPv4 and IPv6. But I also find that many newcomers to IPv6 have difficulty to get rid of "IPv4 think". To let go of the idea that NAT
    is "security" and that IPv6 is insecure because it does not use NAT is something that needs to sink in. Also it takes a while to realize that there is no need to be greedy when assigning addresses. There are 2^64 addresses in a subnet...

    I was more focusing on some of the tools available however when it comes to some of the other things such as subnetting, security and such yes it's slightly different than IPv4. One thing IPv6 uses is NDP vs ARP in IPv4.

    There is more than one road that leads to Rome...

    Absolutely! In this case it doesn't matter if you're talking IPv4 or IPv6.



    ... Verbal agreements frequently lead to verbal disagreements.
    --- MultiMail/Linux v0.52
    * Origin: SBBS - Carnage! 2001:470:8a1e::3 (1:142/103)
  • From Victor Sudakov@2:5005/49 to Brian Rogers on Fri Sep 24 00:15:16 2021
    Dear Brian,

    16 Sep 21 18:45, you wrote to me:

    I don't think so.
    [snip]

    I know for a fact that Yahoo blocks Firefox on IPv6, they may even redirect you to a non-SSL page that reflects such. Yahoo claims that
    SSL on IPv6 for Firefox has security issues thus they deny access to
    their site because of it. Now whether or not that's factually true is another story when you consider they've been cracked twice. Yahoo is
    the only site I've had an issue with being blocked.

    I don't visit Yahoo but I believe you. Whenever you hear of someone doing some really weird and bizarre things, there is a reason to believe.

    Victor Sudakov, VAS4-RIPE, VAS47-RIPN
    --- GoldED+/BSD 1.1.5-b20170303-b20170303
    * Origin: Ulthar (2:5005/49)
  • From Brian Rogers@1:142/103 to Victor Sudakov on Fri Sep 24 15:00:00 2021
    Hello Victor;

    Victor Sudakov wrote to Brian Rogers <=-

    I don't visit Yahoo but I believe you. Whenever you hear of someone
    doing some really weird and bizarre things, there is a reason to
    believe.

    Yahoohoo claims it has to do with something related to the tls layer for firefox's IPv6. I find it hard to believe since they're more like google/ chrome in data mining.

    ... The number you have dailed...Nine-one-one...has been changed.
    --- MultiMail/Linux v0.52
    * Origin: SBBS - Carnage! 2001:470:8a1e::3 (1:142/103)