• For two pins

    From Alexander Koryagin@2:221/6 to All on Mon Dec 28 09:25:38 2020

    Hi, All!

    -----Beginning of the citation-----
    Barnes arrived just after midnight, and he was a very
    different sight from our first meeting. The Brooks
    Brothers stuff had gone, and he now looked like he was
    ready to head into the Nicaraguan jungle at the drop of
    a bomb. Khaki trousers, dark-green twill shirt, Red
    Wing boots. A military-looking watch with canvas strap
    had taken the place of the dress Rolex. I had the
    feeling that for two pins he'd have been in front of a
    mirror, slapping camouflage paint on to his face. The
    lines were deeper than ever.
    ----- The end of the citation -----

    What did the author mean in "I had the feeling that for two pins he'd have been in front of a mirror, slapping camouflage paint on to his face."?

    Bye, All!
    Alexander Koryagin

    ---
    * Origin: nntp://news.fidonet.fi (2:221/6.0)
  • From Dallas Hinton@1:153/7715 to Alexander Koryagin on Mon Dec 28 12:30:45 2020
    Hi, Alexander -- on Dec 28 2020 at 09:25, you wrote:

    What did the author mean in "I had the feeling that for two pins
    he'd have been in front of a mirror, slapping camouflage paint on to
    his face."?

    If you've ever seen a war movie where the soldiers have faces painted in swirls and stripes (usually dark and light green) this is camoflauge paint. It's intended to prevent their faces from showing when they're in the jungle. They would be wearing similar coloured clothing, also. As a point of interest, they wear (and paint) white for use in heavy snow conditions!


    Cheers... Dallas

    --- timEd/NT 1.30+
    * Origin: The BandMaster, Vancouver, CANADA (1:153/7715)
  • From Alexander Koryagin@2:221/6 to Dallas Hinton on Tue Dec 29 08:16:10 2020

    Hi, Dallas Hinton! -> Alexander Koryagin
    I read your message from 28.12.2020 12:30

    What did the author mean in "I had the feeling that for two
    pins he'd have been in front of a mirror, slapping
    camouflage paint on to his face."?

    If you've ever seen a war movie where the soldiers have faces
    painted in swirls and stripes (usually dark and light green)
    this is camoflauge paint. It's intended to prevent their faces
    from showing when they're in the jungle. They would be wearing
    similar coloured clothing, also. As a point of interest, they
    wear (and paint) white for use in heavy snow conditions!

    But how can I connect it to "two pins"?

    Bye, Dallas!
    Alexander Koryagin
    english_tutor 2020

    ---
    * Origin: nntp://news.fidonet.fi (2:221/6.0)
  • From Bob Roberts@1:218/840 to Alexander Koryagin on Tue Dec 29 12:43:56 2020
    But how can I connect it to "two pins"?

    I had to google this one.

    for two pins
    At the slightest provocation; for the smallest reason.

    Primarily heard in UK.
    "I would cancel this party for two pins, but my husband has been looking forward to it all week."

    Bob Roberts
    --- SBBSecho 3.12-Linux
    * Origin: Halls of Valhalla -=- Happy New Year (1:218/840)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to Alexander Koryagin on Tue Dec 29 17:50:44 2020
    Hi, Alexander! Recently you wrote in a message to All:

    -----Beginning of the citation-----
    Barnes arrived just after midnight, and he was a very
    different sight from our first meeting. The Brooks
    Brothers stuff had gone, and he now looked like he was
    ready to head into the Nicaraguan jungle at the drop
    of a bomb. Khaki trousers, dark-green twill shirt, Red
    Wing boots. A military-looking watch with canvas strap
    had taken the place of the dress Rolex. I had the
    feeling that for two pins he'd have been in front of a
    mirror, slapping camouflage paint on to his face. The
    lines were deeper than ever.
    ----- The end of the citation -----

    What did the author mean in "I had the feeling that for
    two pins he'd have been in front of a mirror, slapping
    camouflage paint on to his face."?


    Language:

    When native speakers in this part of the world say "for two pins I'd do xxx", it's an ironic/figurative expression meaning "It wouldn't take much to make me do xxx". Often the idea... although tempting... is rather impractical. I wouldn't seriously expect anybody to carry it out just because I offered them a couple of dressmaker's pins or safety pins I bought at the dollar store. :-Q



    Literature:

    This man appears to be meticulous about his personal appearance & to be in a socioeconomic category where it's routine to pay more for an oufit than a lot of other people earn in a year. At the office he dresses the part of the executive... when he's off duty he prefers a more sporty look, but it's just as well put together & almost as far beyond the average person's budget as what he wears in formal situations. If the writer associates this man's costume change with what actors do when they're playing a role it makes sense to me... [grin].




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)