• word

    From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to Alexander Koryagin on Wed Dec 16 22:21:46 2020
    Hi, Alexander! Recently you wrote in a message to Ardith Hinton:

    So we see why the cavaliers could not afford

    the right road traffic. If the queen got off

    the horse/carriage from the left side going to

    the Buckingham palace,
    |AFAIK residences which have names... such as
    Buckingham Palace, Clarence House, and Windsor
    Castle... don't usually involve "the". But I
    have heard talk of the Smith residence or the
    old Johnson place (e.g.) when the building is
    not generally known by any other title.

    it was a strong example. ;)


    Interesting thought. Not all European countries accepted the idea of driving on the right at the same time... and I don't know when Russia did. But IMHO what teamsters & other working class folks preferred may have carried more weight in countries where a lot of folks wanted to get rid of the monarchy too. In feudal times... when only the upper classes could afford to ride horses they personally owned on thoroughfares available to everybody else... I reckon there was less competition for space. As times changed, a lot more may have depended on how her subjects felt about their queen. And I imagine countries which were next door to one another would have found it inconvenient to have people switch sides every time they crossed the border, just as we did in North America. :-)



    You should not rake your brains and think which variant is
    better. That's why they still follow the rule in England.


    Because my experience with horses is almost nil, I found it a stretch to get my mind around the various reasons some folks prefer one over another... especially now that we no longer have knights who use swords & lances, and most farm produce is transported by truck &/or by train. I am reminded of a story I once heard to the effect that the distance between railway tracks is equivalent to the width of a horse's rear end, since that's how the ancient Romans did it. This strikes me as being akin to folk etymology, but I can't help noticing that the gauge is narrower in coal mines where Welsh ponies are used... [chuckle].

    WRT the way things are done in the Old Country, I can relate. If the Brits drive on the left it doesn't matter to me. I just have to remember (as a pedestrian) that the kindergarten rules I was taught work in reverse Over There
    ... and that the pounds, shillings, and pence in our school math textbooks have been replaced by a system which took Dallas & me a bit of getting used to. The first time we travelled to England as a couple, we got some coins labelled "ten new pence" in change & had to ask a relative what on earth that signified. :-Q



    [re the British roundabouts]
    But we also have a circular motion in the places where several
    roads are connected with a doughnut style road. It works, too.


    It works in England & I think we could make it work. What we have in this neck of the woods, however, are the so-called "traffic calming devices" on residential streets. We saw them in England as well. But what tends to happen Over Here is that people cheat when they want to make a left turn & there is no other traffic on the road, and larger vehicles such as ambulances & fire trucks are at a disadvantage because in such situations the circle is very tight. :-(




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From Alexander Koryagin@2:221/6 to Ardith Hinton on Fri Dec 18 09:30:16 2020
    Hi, Ardith Hinton! -> Alexander Koryagin
    I read your message from 16.12.2020 22:21

    So we see why the cavaliers could not afford the right road
    traffic. If the queen got off the horse/carriage from the left
    side going to the Buckingham palace,

    |AFAIK residences which have names... such as
    Buckingham Palace, Clarence House, and Windsor
    Castle... don't usually involve "the". But I
    have heard talk of the Smith residence or the
    old Johnson place (e.g.) when the building is
    not generally known by any other title.

    it was a strong example.

    Interesting thought. Not all European countries accepted the idea
    of driving on the right at the same time... and I don't know when
    Russia did.

    In technique, Russia, during the Tsarist time, followed mostly behind France, Germany and Italy. A lot of specialists were invited from these countries, and we adopted many things from them.

    But IMHO what teamsters & other working class folks preferred may
    have carried more weight in countries where a lot of folks wanted
    to get rid of the monarchy too. In feudal times... when only the
    upper classes could afford to ride horses they personally owned on thoroughfares available to everybody else... I reckon there was
    less competition for space. As times changed, a lot more may have
    depended on how her subjects felt about their queen. And I imagine countries which were next door to one another would have found it inconvenient to have people switch sides every time they crossed
    the border, just as we did in North America.

    The UK is isolated in this sense. Maybe it is the reason why it has followed its own habits without looking at its neighbours.

    You should not rake your brains and think which variant is better.
    That's why they still follow the rule in England.

    Because my experience with horses is almost nil, I found it a
    stretch to get my mind around the various reasons some folks prefer
    one over another... especially now that we no longer have knights
    who use swords & lances, and most farm produce is transported by
    truck &/or by train. I am reminded of a story I once heard to the
    effect that the distance between railway tracks is equivalent to
    the width of a horse's rear end, since that's how the ancient
    Romans did it. This strikes me as being akin to folk etymology, but
    I can't help noticing that the gauge is narrower in coal mines
    where Welsh ponies are used... [chuckle].

    All temporal railways are usually narrow-gauged. They don't need big speed, but you can save a lot of wood on sleepers.

    WRT the way things are done in the Old Country, I can relate. If
    the Brits drive on the left it doesn't matter to me. I just have to remember (as a pedestrian) that the kindergarten rules I was taught
    work in reverse Over There.. and that the pounds, shillings, and
    pence in our school math textbooks have been replaced by a system
    which took Dallas & me a bit of getting used to. The first time we travelled to England as a couple, we got some coins labelled "ten
    new pence" in change & had to ask a relative what on earth that signified.: - Q

    But to understand the decimal system is a lot easier than the old English one. I also knew the latter sometime, when I learned English, reading "Essential English for foreign students", by C. E. Eckersley. But I don't remember the old British money now. I forgot it probably by the same reason the UK dropped it. ;)

    [re the British roundabouts]
    But we also have a circular motion in the places where several
    roads are connected with a doughnut style road. It works, too.

    It works in England & I think we could make it work. What we have
    in this neck of the woods, however, are the so-called "traffic
    calming devices" on residential streets. We saw them in England as
    well.

    We called them "Sleeping policeman" (a speed bump). Its a very useful thing. We in Russia have a long time saying that there are two main troubles in Russia - fools and bad roads. Times have changed. The roads have become good and smooth. And fools are speeding along them with crazy speed. So - "Don't make good roads for fools!", I invented my own saying. ;-)

    Bye, Ardith Hinton!
    Alexander Koryagin

    english_tutor 2020

    ---
    * Origin: nntp://news.fidonet.fi (2:221/6.0)
  • From Ardith Hinton@1:153/716 to Alexander Koryagin on Sat Jan 23 18:46:38 2021
    Hi, Alexander! Recently you wrote in a message to Ardith Hinton:

    The other day I unintentionally omitted a proposition.
    Even English teachers make misteaks. What matters AFAIC
    is that you can correct your own errors....

    Did you mean a preposition?


    Oops... indeed I did. Give yourself a gold star. :-))



    I think the inflation in Canada is not so high as in
    Russia. How many percent do you have per year?


    On average it's been roughly 2% per year for the past few years, not counting 2020, but in the more distant past I've seen it go a lot higher. And the numbers are based on the prices of all sorts of things... many of which we don't usually buy at frequent intervals. The price of food has increased with the onset of COVID-19 and is expected to rise another 5% within the next year. By the time it is lumped in with the prices of things others don't need to buy right away because they're working from home... or can't afford to buy because they're unemployed... the composite picture may be quite misleading.

    Late flash: Vancouver City Council announced recently that property taxes will go up by 5% this year. The cost of natural gas will go up by 6.59% this year as well. But meanwhile the Bank of Canada is keeping the prime rate at .25%, meaning folks may get very little interest on their savings.

    While I could ask what the inflation rate is in Russia, the averages may not be any more helpful from an individual POV than they are here.... ;-)



    Times are changing. A day on two ago I saw in an internet
    shop a lock for a bicycle which can be unlocked only via
    a smart phone application. ;-) It has an alarm system, too.
    Looks as a usual bicycle lock. ;)


    Hmm. Sounds like a good idea... until you realize that in Vancouver bicycle theft is increasingly common & what kind of lock a person uses may not matter much to professional thieves. We've watched film footage of them using bolt cutters etc. to get through a chain or steal an entire bicycle rack. :-Q



    When smaller businesses such as Mom & Dad's Grocery can't
    afford to do that they must still accept cash. If their
    produce is better & cheaper than what I can find at the
    local supermarket, and they offer more variety, I may still
    choose to buy such things from Mom & Dad whenever their
    shop isn't particularly crowded.

    So, people really can start money laundering, in a real
    sense of this phrase. ;-)


    Ah... now there's a wonderful example of a live metaphor! Years ago Dallas & I read a book by a woman who was "in service" during the 1920's. She mentioned that her employers insisted all folding money & newspapers be ironed before they'd touch either. And a female friend who is somewhat older than we are routinely ironed sheets & pillow cases to kill any nits (i.e. insect eggs) which might be there. I wonder if today's plastic bills can be washed. :-)))




    --- timEd/386 1.10.y2k+
    * Origin: Wits' End, Vancouver CANADA (1:153/716)
  • From Alexander Koryagin@2:221/6 to Ardith Hinton on Tue Jan 26 10:13:22 2021
    Hi, Ardith Hinton - Alexander Koryagin!
    I read your message from 23.01.2021 18:46

    I think the inflation in Canada is not so high as in Russia. How
    many percent do you have per year?

    On average it's been roughly 2% per year for the past few years,
    not counting 2020, but in the more distant past I've seen it go a
    lot higher. And the numbers are based on the prices of all sorts of things... many of which we don't usually buy at frequent intervals.
    The price of food has increased with the onset of COVID-19 and is
    expected to rise another 5% within the next year. By the time it is
    lumped in with the prices of things others don't need to buy right
    away because they're working from home... or can't afford to buy
    because they're unemployed... the composite picture may be quite misleading.

    Late flash: Vancouver City Council announced recently that property
    taxes will go up by 5% this year. The cost of natural gas will go
    up by 6.59% this year as well. But meanwhile the Bank of Canada is
    keeping the prime rate at .25%, meaning folks may get very little
    interest on their savings.

    So actually you are losing you bank money by 2% per year. Is your pension indexing or your pension is constant?

    Times are changing. A day on two ago I saw in an internet shop a
    lock for a bicycle which can be unlocked only via a smart phone
    application. It has an alarm system, too. Looks as a usual bicycle
    lock.

    Hmm. Sounds like a good idea... until you realize that in Vancouver bicycle theft is increasingly common & what kind of lock a person
    uses may not matter much to professional thieves. We've watched
    film footage of them using bolt cutters etc. to get through a chain
    or steal an entire bicycle rack.: - Q

    Yes, that lock can be useful only in an open public place. The cutting tools now are in a great progress. I see it looking at how our railways fight with people. The new railway policy now is that people should not enter the passenger platform without a ticket. So they barred all railways with high iron fences, sometime literally cutting whole cities in two. But this fences are mercilessly cut by a numerous cutting tools during the night. Actually every day the railway workers go to mend the fences, and these fences look very funny and pitifully because of their numerous patches.

    When smaller businesses such as Mom & Dad's Grocery can't afford
    to do that they must still accept cash. If their produce is better
    & cheaper than what I can find at the local supermarket, and they
    offer more variety, I may still choose to buy such things from Mom
    & Dad whenever their shop isn't particularly crowded.

    So, people really can start money laundering, in a real sense of
    this phrase.

    Ah... now there's a wonderful example of a live metaphor! Years ago
    Dallas & I read a book by a woman who was "in service" during the
    1920's. She mentioned that her employers insisted all folding money
    & newspapers be ironed before they'd touch either. And a female
    friend who is somewhat older than we are routinely ironed sheets &
    pillow cases to kill any nits (i.e. insect eggs) which might be
    there. I wonder if today's plastic bills can be washed. :-)))

    I heard that viruses don't live long on dry surface.

    Bye, Ardith!
    Alexander Koryagin
    english_tutor 2021

    ---
    * Origin: nntp://news.fidonet.fi (2:221/6.0)