• A Little History Lesson

    From Charles Stephenson@1:226/17 to All on Fri Nov 23 01:00:22 2018
    Hello!

    I was talking to a fellow Sysop in another Echo aboutt Ham Radio. He told me a brief history about why it's called "Ham" Radio, I thought it was pretty interesting!

    I've had a few friends over the years that where Ham Radio Operators, but I never REALLY knew what it was, or what you even do on it.

    I'd like to hear some history and personal comments about it, I'm really curious!
    Regards,
    KrUpTiOn
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    * Origin: The New Frontier 2: thenewfrontier2.hopto.org (OH) (1:226/17)
  • From Daryl Stout@1:19/33 to CHARLES STEPHENSON on Sat Nov 24 16:21:00 2018
    Charles,

    I'd like to hear some history and personal comments about it, I'm really CS>curious!

    I got into it originally for Skywarn Severe Weather operations in
    1991, when the FCC removed the Morse Code requirement (5 wpm exam) for
    the Technician Class license.

    In 2000, the FCC reduced the Morse Code Requirement to just 5 WPM for
    the Technician Plus (Technician with 5 wpm code exam credit), the
    General, and the Amateur Extra (it was originally 13 WPM for the General
    and Advanced, and 20 WPM for Amateur Extra). In 2007, the FCC removed
    the Morse Code requirement altogether. People are learning the Morse
    Code now because they WANT to...and NOT because they HAVE to.

    The funniest story I heard on that (I likely have posted this in other echoes) was these 4 hams sitting around a restaurant table in Annapolis, Maryland...telling each other dirty jokes in CW (it stands for
    "Continuous Wave", another name of Morse Code). This drop dead gorgeous, curvaceous female, walked up to them, and admonished the group "You boys
    need to watch your language. I teach CW at the Naval Academy across the street", and walked out!! They were as red as tomatoes!! <BG>

    Three months after my wife died (2 months after the FCC dropped the
    Morse Code requirement) in 2007, I decided for grins, to try to upgrade,
    and become a Volunteer Examiner, to give and grade the exams. I signed
    up with Ham Test Online (www.hamradiolicenseexam.com), and studied 2
    hours a day for 2 weeks on each one. I went from Technician to General
    in 14 days...and from General to Amateur Extra 13 days later. It was THE
    BEST MONEY I EVER SPENT in amateur radio.

    For more information on what I've done in ham radio, go to www.qrz.com
    and search for WX1DER -- unless you're logged in, you won't see my
    personal information, but you can read the biography.

    Daryl, WX1DER

    ===
    OLX 1.53 Why's the third hand on the watch called the second hand?
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    * Origin: FIDONet: The Thunderbolt BBS - tbolt.synchro.net (1:19/33)
  • From Ed Vance@1:2320/105 to Daryl Stout on Tue Nov 27 22:11:00 2018
    11-24-18 16:21 Daryl Stout wrote to CHARLES STEPHENSON about A Little History Lesson
    Howdy! Daryl,

    @MSGID: <5BFA1FDE.1947.amtradio@capitolcityonline.net>
    @REPLY: <5BF8F857.1945.amtradio@capitolcityonline.net>
    Charles,

    I'd like to hear some history and personal comments about it, I'm really
    curious!

    I got into it originally for Skywarn Severe Weather operations in
    1991, when the FCC removed the Morse Code requirement (5 wpm exam) for
    the Technician Class license.

    In 2000, the FCC reduced the Morse Code Requirement to just 5 WPM for the Technician Plus (Technician with 5 wpm code exam credit), the
    General, and the Amateur Extra (it was originally 13 WPM for the
    General and Advanced, and 20 WPM for Amateur Extra). In 2007, the FCC removed the Morse Code requirement altogether. People are learning the Morse Code now because they WANT to...and NOT because they HAVE to.

    I've seen You mention "People are learning the Morse Code now because they
    WANT to...and NOT because they HAVE to" before and I was wondering where
    You read about that?

    I don't have a subscription to QST and haven't went to the Library to read
    it for many years.

    I like reading the Amateur Radio Newsline that You and Others post in
    Amateur Radio BBS Echos to learn what is happening in/to Ham Radio.

    I appreciate when Other Hams write about things they know about in BBS
    echos too.

    I could listen to the ARRL CW Bulletins like I use to do, but I can read
    them in a Ham Echo the next day.





    ... !neercs eht fo kcab eht morf skool enilgat a woh si sihT
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    * Origin: capitolcityonline.net * Telnet/SSH:2022/HTTP (1:2320/105)
  • From Charles Stephenson@1:226/17 to Daryl Stout on Wed Nov 28 01:27:29 2018
    Re: A Little History Lesson
    By: Daryl Stout to CHARLES STEPHENSON on Sat Nov 24 2018 04:21 pm

    Charles,

    I got into it originally for Skywarn Severe Weather operations in
    1991, when the FCC removed the Morse Code requirement (5 wpm exam) for
    the Technician Class license.

    In 2000, the FCC reduced the Morse Code Requirement to just 5 WPM for
    the Technician Plus (Technician with 5 wpm code exam credit), the
    General, and the Amateur Extra (it was originally 13 WPM for the General and Advanced, and 20 WPM for Amateur Extra). In 2007, the FCC removed
    the Morse Code requirement altogether. People are learning the Morse
    Code now because they WANT to...and NOT because they HAVE to.

    The funniest story I heard on that (I likely have posted this in other echoes) was these 4 hams sitting around a restaurant table in Annapolis, Maryland...telling each other dirty jokes in CW (it stands for
    "Continuous Wave", another name of Morse Code). This drop dead gorgeous, curvaceous female, walked up to them, and admonished the group "You boys need to watch your language. I teach CW at the Naval Academy across the street", and walked out!! They were as red as tomatoes!! <BG>

    Wow... Thanks for the info! I'm def. gonna log on and read more about it. I've only seen maybe 2 rigs in my life and was rather confussed by just looking at it. At the time I had other things on my hobby list, but I've always wondered about HAM radio.

    Thank you!
    Regards,
    KrUpTiOn
    --- SBBSecho 3.04-Linux
    * Origin: The New Frontier 2: thenewfrontier2.hopto.org (OH) (1:226/17)
  • From Daryl Stout@1:19/33 to ED VANCE on Wed Nov 28 22:10:00 2018
    Howdy! Daryl,

    Hi, Ed...

    I've seen You mention "People are learning the Morse Code now because they EV>WANT to...and NOT because they HAVE to" before and I was wondering where EV>You read about that?

    That's the impression I get. Right around the time when the FCC
    removed the CW requirement completely for U.S. ham radio licenses,
    Vibroplex, who makes nice CW keyers, literally had their phones "ringing
    off the wall" every day for a month. They couldn't keep up with the
    demand, and hams were finding out "how much fun CW actually was".

    I don't have a subscription to QST and haven't went to the Library to read EV>it for many years.

    I read very little in QST. I look at the Happenings column, the
    Hamfests section, information from the ARRL/VEC, and the Silent Keys
    page. Otherwise, I skip over most of the articles...because the
    technical and electronic stuff was never my forte'.

    I like reading the Amateur Radio Newsline that You and Others post in EV>Amateur Radio BBS Echos to learn what is happening in/to Ham Radio.

    In reading some of the stories, where hams get busted for doing stupid things, I have to really wonder if they were these who, when the brains
    were passed out, they thought "trains" was said, and they missed
    theirs!!

    I appreciate when Other Hams write about things they know about in BBS EV>echos too.

    I found an old presentation I did at a local hamfest over 6 years ago,
    called "You're Licensed...Now What??". I couldn't believe how out of
    date it was now!!

    For the most part, my travel days outside of central Arkansas are
    over. However, if I can get some money from this "Miller Trust" in the
    spring, after paying the personal property taxes and income taxes for my
    Mom, myself, and my brother...I am hoping to do one final big trip to a hamfest. However, it's not guaranteed...I won't know until March if I
    can do it, but I may not be able to do it at all.

    I could listen to the ARRL CW Bulletins like I use to do, but I can
    read them in a Ham Echo the next day.

    With the nervous system damage I've got from 2 lightning strikes, I
    was never able to copy CW well. I did take a 5 wpm test for grins years
    ago, but failed it. It's a moot point now, though.

    ... !neercs eht fo kcab eht morf skool enilgat a woh si sihT

    I thought I'd have to clean my glasses, or the computer off, for a
    minute there. :P

    Daryl

    ===
    OLX 1.53 You'll have no other Sysop before me (just kidding).
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    * Origin: FIDONet: The Thunderbolt BBS - tbolt.synchro.net (1:19/33)
  • From Daryl Stout@1:19/33 to CHARLES STEPHENSON on Wed Nov 28 22:11:00 2018
    Charles,

    Wow... Thanks for the info! I'm def. gonna log on and read more about it. I' CS>only seen maybe 2 rigs in my life and was rather confussed by just looking a CS>it. At the time I had other things on my hobby list, but I've always wondere CS>about HAM radio.

    A lot has changed since I was first licensed over 27 years ago. But,
    I've made so many new friends...locally, around the country, and around
    the world. And, at some of the yearly events, known as "hamfests", you
    can meet the people you've talked to on the radio. The funny part is
    that the mental image you made of them is NOT AT ALL what they look like
    in person. <G>

    Daryl

    ===
    OLX 1.53 You'll win the lottery, & spend the winnings on The Sysop
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